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  #1  
Old 09-21-2007, 11:57 AM
Ganoderma
 
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Default Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations

Hi there,
I'm able to obtain pure Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2), I would like to
test the substrate sterilisation with this product, though I'm
wondering about two things.

What would be the concentration to sterilise once at start to
eliminate as much unwanted organisms? And what is the duration of the
H2O2 -> H2O+O2 reaction?

What would be the highest concentration in which P.cubensis could
grow in?

I've been searching on the net for concentration, but the internet
only has poor measurments, such as 1/3 cup... I'd need percentage of
pure H2O2 in water concentrations... If any of you could provide a
link (URL) with more info on the subject, it would be apreciated.
(BTW, I already know about Rush Wayne's method, and I'm looking
forward to buy his books, but now I'm just looking to know the
numbers!)

Thanks in advance!
Reishi
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  #2  
Old 09-21-2007, 11:57 AM
Jacobe Hazzard
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations

Ganoderma wrote:
> Hi there,
> I'm able to obtain pure Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2), I
> would like to test the substrate sterilisation with this
> product, though I'm wondering about two things.
>
> What would be the concentration to sterilise once at
> start to eliminate as much unwanted organisms? And what
> is the duration of the H2O2 -> H2O+O2 reaction?
>
> What would be the highest concentration in which
> P.cubensis could grow in?
>
> I've been searching on the net for concentration, but
> the internet only has poor measurments, such as 1/3
> cup... I'd need percentage of pure H2O2 in water
> concentrations... If any of you could provide a link
> (URL) with more info on the subject, it would be
> apreciated. (BTW, I already know about Rush Wayne's
> method, and I'm looking forward to buy his books, but now
> I'm just looking to know the numbers!)
>
> Thanks in advance!
> Reishi


Sorry I don't know anything about the concentrations you want to use, but
could you keep records of your progress and let us know how it goes?

Thanks


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  #3  
Old 09-21-2007, 11:57 AM
MJ
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations

glucidum@yahoo.com (Ganoderma) writes:

> Hi the
> I've been searching on the net for concentration, but the internet
> only has poor measurments, such as 1/3 cup... I'd need percentage of
> pure H2O2 in water concentrations... If any of you could provide a
> link (URL) with more info on the subject, it would be apreciated.
> (BTW, I already know about Rush Wayne's method, and I'm looking
> forward to buy his books, but now I'm just looking to know the
> numbers!)
>


I just deleted a longer answer I wrote, because I've decided
that I have no idea why this is important to you. Why do
you want to deal with "pure H2O2" at all? Helpful concentrations
(that kill many contaminants, and don't damage mycelium) are
very, very, small--something on the order of 0.02%. That's much
more dilute than what's available approximately for free at your
local drug store.

If you insist on doing it your way, you can use arithmetic
to help. I'll get you started: those websites that mention
a third of a cup of peroxide are undoubtably talking about
a 3% solution.

--
MJ
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  #4  
Old 09-21-2007, 11:58 AM
Ganoderma
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations

> I just deleted a longer answer I wrote, because I've decided
> that I have no idea why this is important to you. Why do
> you want to deal with "pure H2O2" at all? Helpful concentrations
> (that kill many contaminants, and don't damage mycelium) are
> very, very, small--something on the order of 0.02%. That's much
> more dilute than what's available approximately for free at your
> local drug store.


I'm interested in dealing with pure H2O2 because, I happen to have
found a shop that sells it for almost nothing. And I was unable to
find Hydrogen peroxide food grade, all I found had other chemicals in
it, which I certainly don't want to put in my substrate. You might
want to argue about how dangerous such a small amount of those
chemicals may be, but hey, I don't. I like to be as precise as
possible.

> If you insist on doing it your way, you can use arithmetic
> to help. I'll get you started: those websites that mention
> a third of a cup of peroxide are undoubtably talking about
> a 3% solution.


My problem with the websites, is that I'm not sure if they know what
they're talking about, one website talks about a spoon of 3% H2O2,
while the other talks about 1/3 of a cup of unknown concentration. I
just cannot base myself on these values and I'm sure you understand.

Thanks,
Reishi
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  #5  
Old 09-21-2007, 11:58 AM
MJ
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations

glucidum@yahoo.com (Ganoderma) writes:
>
> I'm interested in dealing with pure H2O2 because, I happen to have
> found a shop that sells it for almost nothing. And I was unable to
> find Hydrogen peroxide food grade, all I found had other chemicals in
> it, which I certainly don't want to put in my substrate. You might
> want to argue about how dangerous such a small amount of those
> chemicals may be, but hey, I don't. I like to be as precise as
> possible.


Okay. I'm not really interested in arguing, but I am curious.
I've never seen H2O2 sold as anything but pure (diluted with
H20, of course). Nor have I ever seen "food grade" peroxide.
What country are you in?


> My problem with the websites, is that I'm not sure if they know what
> they're talking about, one website talks about a spoon of 3% H2O2,
> while the other talks about 1/3 of a cup of unknown concentration. I
> just cannot base myself on these values and I'm sure you understand.


In the United States, you have to go to some effort to get anything
but 3% or 6% concentrations (i.e., visit a specialty store of some
kind), and 3% is by far the more common. If the website author
doesn't specify, he almost surely means 3%.

If you're worried about the imprecision of the measurements, you
have a point. On the other hand, 3% is only the nominal
concentration; it's not realistic to expect better than 0.1%
accuracy without great effort. Dr. Wayne spends a good number
of pages in his first book talking about how to work out the
real peroxide concentration from your storebought bottle. I've
never bothered; P. cubensis is forgiving enough that that
level of precision isn't necessary. I've never had a problem
assuming that a bottle of "3% Hydrogen Peroxide" is precisely
3%.



I've poured lots of agar plates at 0.02% in open air, with
no problems. I've also tried instant brown rice (the kind
that's pre-cooked and freeze-dried; destroys lots of peroxide-
decomposing enzymes) soaked in a 0.3% solution. Most of
the brown rice jars colonized without contamination (remarkable,
since I didn't even bother to filter their air supply), but
the end product was kinda goopy. I think I had too much water
in there. Might work better mixed with verm or something.

(There's no typo in that 0.02%--very little H2O2 is needed
to protect agar. I was measuring it out with an eyedropper.)


The contamination resistance of the brown rice+peroxide is
interesting, and might be a useful technique with any grain,
as long as you do it in addition to pressure-cooking, and
not as a replacement. Say, after you take the jars out of
the pressure cooker, splash enough in to get in the .1% to .3%
range. Since I put the glove box together, contaminated
jars haven't been a problem for me, so I've never experimented
here.


That's it. I'm totally tapped out. There's a couple of numbers
for you to extract out of all that verbiage; if you need more,
you'll need to find a better source. Good luck with your project.


--
MJ
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Psilocybin mushrooms possess psychedelic properties. They are commonly known as "magic mushrooms" or "shrooms", and are available in smart shops in many parts of the world, though some countries have outlawed their sale. A number of other mushrooms are eaten for their psychoactive effects, such as fly agaric, which is used for shamanic purposes by tribes in northeast Siberia. They have also been used in the West to potentiate, or increase, religious experiences. Because of their psychoactive properties, some mushrooms have played a role in native medicine, where they have been used to affect mental and physical healing, and to facilitate visionary states. One such ritual is the Velada ceremony. A representative figure of traditional mushroom use is the shaman and curandera (priest-healer) María Sabina. Medicinal mushrooms Currently, many species of mushrooms and fungi utilized as folk medicines for thousands of years are under intense study by ethnobotanists and medical researchers. Maitake, shiitake, and reishi are prominent among those being researched for their potential anti-cancer, anti-viral, and/or immunity-enhancement properties. Psilocybin, originally an extract of certain psychedelic mushrooms, is being studied for its ability to help people suffering from mental disease, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder. Minute amounts have been reported to stop cluster and migraine headache

Psilocybin mushrooms (also called psilocybian mushrooms) are fungi that contain the psychedelic substances psilocybin and psilocin, and occasionally other psychoactive tryptamines. There are multiple colloquial terms for psilocybin mushrooms, the most common being magic mushrooms or 'shrooms. And Psilocybe cubensis is a species of psychedelic mushroom whose principle active compounds are psilocybin and psilocin. Psilocybe cubensis belongs to the Strophariaceae family of fungi and was previously known as Stropharia cubensis. The mushroom's cap is reddish-cinnamon brown to golden brown in color with white to yellowish stipe and will turn bluish/greenish when bruised.